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LET’S ASK ADHD PATIENTS ABOUT SYMPTOMS IN MULTIPLE SETTINGS

It is important to examine ADHD patients’ symptoms relative to home, social, and work life.

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QUESTIONING HOW PATIENTS EXPERIENCE ADHD IN MULTIPLE SETTINGS

How colleagues are examining patients’ symptoms
relative to home, work, and social settings.

This is an informal, uncontrolled survey which is not intended to be
relied upon as being representative of prevalent position among
clinicians or the current research in this area.

1

Do most of your patients describe their ADHD symptoms without being prompted?

NEARLY HALF OF PATIENTS MAY NOT BRING UP THEIR SYMPTOMS. IT’S UP TO US TO ASK.

In fact, 48% of ADHD patients may not share their ADHD symptoms with a doctor.*1

Always

24 %

Sometimes

60 %

Never

15 %
2

Which setting do you ask your patients about most, relative to their ADHD symptoms?

PATIENTS WITH ADHD EXPERIENCE SYMPTOMS OUTSIDE OF THE WORKPLACE.

Adults may be challenged by activities and tasks that happen before and after their workday, including those symptoms experienced at home and in social settings.2-4

Home

21 %

Work

62 %

Social

17 %

Home

Adult ADHD symptoms may negatively impact activities at home.5

If symptoms persist beyond work, shouldn't we ask about multiple settings?

3

Which of these ADHD symptoms do you believe your patients experience most often at home?

ADULT ADHD SYMPTOMS EXTEND BEYOND WORK.

Symptoms of inattention such as often being forgetful in daily activities and difficulty with organization can make it challenging to accomplish daily tasks like remembering to pay bills on time and keeping appointments.3,6,7

Difficulty sustaining attention in tasks

23 %

Difficulty with organization and time management

53 %

Forgetful in daily activities

24 %
4

In your opinion, how often do ADHD symptoms interfere with household activities?

ADHD SYMPTOMS CAN AFFECT LIFE AT HOME.

Adults with ADHD may have a difficult time keeping track of items used for daily activities, such as keys, wallets, glasses or mobile phones.3

Often

79 %

Occasionally

18 %

Seldom

3 %

Social

Adult ADHD symptoms can negatively impact social activities.4

The impact of ADHD extends beyond the workplace.4

5

Which of these ADHD symptoms do you believe your patients present most often in social settings?

SYMPTOMS OF ADHD CAN PERSIST INTO ADULTHOOD.

In most individuals with ADHD, symptoms of motoric hyperactivity become less obvious in adulthood, but difficulties with restlessness, inattention, poor planning, and impulsivity persist.3

Doesn’t listen when spoken to

24 %

Easily distracted

48 %

Talks excessively

28 %
6

How often do you ask about your patients’ experiences in social settings?

ADHD SYMPTOMS CAN INTERFERE WITH OR REDUCE THE QUALITY OF SOCIAL FUNCTIONING.

In order to have ADHD, several symptoms must, among other diagnostic criteria, be present in two or more settings and interfere with or reduce the quality of social, academic, or occupational functioning.3

Always

42 %

Sometimes

49 %

Never

9 %

Work

Some adults with ADHD may struggle to manage symptoms on their own.6-8

Are we recognizing the true impact of ADHD on patients, inside and outside daily work life?

7

How often do your patients share concerns about their behavior in the workplace?

ADHD SYMPTOMS CAN CAUSE IMPAIRMENT AT WORK.

Inattentive symptoms of adult ADHD such as often being forgetful in daily activities and difficulty with organization can often impact work productivity.4,9 It’s important not only to talk about symptoms patients experience at work, but how they feel symptoms may be affecting other areas of their life.3,4

Often

45 %

Sometimes

44 %

Never

11 %
8

Do you ask about your patients' coping strategies at both work and home?

WE MAY NOT BE SEEING HOW PATIENTS EXPERIENCE ADHD IN MULTIPLE SETTINGS.

Adults with ADHD may develop coping mechanisms, but they may spend excessive amounts of energy to manage symptoms on their own.4,8

Always

55 %

Sometimes

41 %

Never

5 %
9

Do you ask each adult patient with ADHD about symptoms in multiple settings?

AN INDIVIDUAL'S ADHD SYMPTOMS MAY MANIFEST DIFFERENTLY DEPENDING ON THE CONTEXT OF A GIVEN SETTING.

To meet the diagnostic criteria for ADHD, several symptoms of ADHD (inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive) must be present in two or more settings (e.g., at home, at work, in social settings). Research shows each patient's treatment plan should be individualized based on your assessment of each patient's needs and desires.1-5

Always

61 %

Sometimes

33 %

Seldom

6 %

ARE WE ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS ABOUT ADHD TO ASSESS THE PRESENCE OF SYMPTOMS IN MULTIPLE SETTINGS?

References

*Proportion estimated from a cumulative lifetime probability curve in a weighted number of respondents with a lifetime history of ADHD (n=253) using collected data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication of 9,282 adults aged 18 to 44 years conducted from 2000 to 2003. These individuals meet the criteria for ADHD according to the World Mental Health-Composite Internal Diagnostic Interview.

1. Wang PS, Berglund P, Olfson M, et al. Failure and delay in initial treatment contact after first onset of mental disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005;62(6):603-613. doi: 10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.603.

2. Adler LA, Chua HC. Management of ADHD in adults. J Clin Psychiatry. 2002:63(Suppl 12):29-35.

3. American Psychiatric Association. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association; 2013:59-65.

4. Ginsberg Y, Quintero J, Anand E, et al. Underdiagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in adult patients: a review of the literature. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2014;16(3).

5. Eakin L, Minde K, Hechtman L, et al. The marital and family functioning of adults with ADHD and their spouses. J Atten Disord. 2004;8(1):1-10. doi: 10.1177/108705470400800101.

6. Goodman DW, Lasser RA, Babcock T, et al. Managing ADHD across the lifespan in the primary care setting. Postgrad Med. 2011;123(5):14-26. doi: 10.3810/pgm.2011.09.2456.

7. Brod M, Perwein A, Adler L, et al. Conceptualization and assessment of quality of life for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Prim Psychiatry. 2005;12(6):58-64.

8. Asherson P, Akehurst R, Kooij JJS, et al. Under diagnosis of adult ADHD: cultural influences and societal burden. J Atten Disord. 2012;16(5 Suppl):20S-38S. doi: 10.1177/1087054711435360.

9. Subcommittee on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder; Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management. ADHD: clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Pediatrics. 2011;128(5):1007-1022.

10. Pliszka S; AACAP Work Group on Quality Issues. Practice parameter for the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2007:46(7):894-921.

11. Murphy K. Psychosocial treatments for ADHD in teens and adults: a practice-friendly review. J Clin Psychol. 2005;61(5):607-619.